Campbell River, British Columbia
We welcome a contributing columnist, Iain-Jamie Peterson.
Iain also writes for one of our local newspapers and has allowed us to reprint some of his writings here.

Caledonian Corner

I've always enjoyed gardening in an amateur kind of way.

 I started off strictly with vegetables so I could give my poor stomach a chance to eat something healthy. Unfortunately, it seemed every slug and bug had the same idea, and my once prized tomatoes managed to pick up the dreaded blight.

 It was this calamity that changed my gardening endeavors to flowers and plants. I won't go so far as saying it was good for my soul, but I did get a great kick out of rescuing orphan plants that had almost expired; give them some TLC, and playing the "right" music always seemed to pick them up.

 A lot of money is not needed but a discerning eye on what plants grow best in full sun, partial sun and shade certainly helps. I've always marveled at how plants can survive on meager amounts of water and poor soil, but when taken care of, simply burst out into a vivid display of colour.

 This is also the time of year we check out our clothing wardrobes and wonder whether we can fit into our cut-offs without having to try them on lying prostate on the floor holding our breath. I always thought that waistline problems came from the usual over indulgences but according to the latest TV medical break through, poor sleep habits will put inches onto the old waistline. I don't usually think too much about new medical theories but this one I like.
I can't remember the last time I had an eight-hour visit to the Land of Nod, but I know it's been years. So far I've managed to keep off sleeping pills because of the after effects, and watching a bald man spraying his head with "instant hair" on TV at 2 a.m. just keeps me in stitches.

 Fortunately with hot balmy weather just around the corner, the short Canadian summer will spread it's warmth and I can say goodbye to insomnia and "Sleepless in Black Creek."

IAIN-JAMIE PATERSON


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